News

Brazil’s Poor Pay World Cup Penalty

On June 15, the opening day of the Confederations Cup in Brazil — a warmup to the World Cup — thousands protested across the country against the amount of money being spent to host these mega-events. With signs that said “We don’t need the World Cup” and “We need money for hospitals and education”, protesters were sprayed with tear gas and dispersed with rubber bullets before the opening match in Brasilia. At least 39 were injured and 30 were arrested. Inside the stadium, president Dilma Roussef was booed as she inaugurated the Brazil-Japan match. Today, June 17, there are protests going on all over the country.

Brazil protests take to the pitch as People’s Cup highlights evictions

Action from the People's Cup in Rio de Janeiro. The banners read 'No to evictions' and 'Second occupation, Quilombo of the Warriors'. A quilombo refers to a community of runaway slaves. Photo: Pilar Olivares/Reuters

Physically, it’s only a few kilometres away from the Maracanã stadium, but in symbolism, the People’s Cup could not be much further removed from the mega sporting events now being staged in Rio de Janeiro and other Brazilian cities.

As Brazil Marks One-Year Countdown to 2014 World Cup, Thousands Cope with Forced Evictions

170,000 Brazilians are at risk of losing—or have already lost—their homes in forced evictions tied to preparations for the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics in 2016. While mega-events such as the World Cup are a driver of forced evictions, the phenomenon is not limited to Brazil or to major sporting events: an estimated 15 million people across the globe are forcibly uprooted from their homes each year as a result of on-going physical abuse, threats and intimidation and often without consultation and compensation.

Will Brazil be left counting the cost of hosting the World Cup and Olympics?

BRIC countries have tried to use these mega-events to boost development by accelerating investments in infrastructure and lifting services, governance and local business to international standards. However, the cost to the public purse and the communities affected can be enormous, prompting criticism that the money would be better spent at grassroots level, on improving health and education, rather than on awarding prestige projects to construction companies.

Official Mission to the Republic of Indonesia Preliminary findings: Media Statement

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Read the Special Rapporteur media statement regarding her preliminary findings during the mission to Indonesia.

UN envoy told to press RI on housing rights

Defending rights: In this stock photograph dated June 4, farmers and activists rally in front of the National Land Agency in Jakarta to call for an end to land grabbing and the implementation of agrarian reform. Many people have been displaced due to agrarian conflicts in Indonesia, activists say. Photo: JP/Jerry Adiguna

Human rights groups have called on the United Nations special rapporteur on housing rights, Raquel Rolnik, to demand that the Indonesian government immediately resolve cases of housing rights violations, such as forced evictions and the forced expulsion of minority groups.

UN Rapporteur Visits Indonesia to Observe Housing

A United Nations special rapporteur has arrived in Indonesia to gauge the government’s commitment to ensuring adequate housing for all. A statement from the office of the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights said that Raquel Rolnik would be in the country from May 30 to June 11 to visit communities in Jakarta and elsewhere.

UN envoy told to press RI on housing rights

Human rights groups have called on the United Nations special rapporteur on housing rights, Raquel Rolnik, to demand that the Indonesian government immediately resolve cases of housing rights violations, such as forced evictions and the forced expulsion of minority groups.

Abbotsford Spreads Chicken Manure In City To Rid Itself Of The Homeless

City of Abbotsford employees have spread chicken manure over land within city limits used as a camp for the homeless. According to advocate for homeless, James Breckenridge, this is but the latest in a series of tactics used by the City in an apparent effort to keep the homeless moving.

Once Unsafe, Rio’s Shantytowns See Rapid Gentrification

(Português) The locals are being priced out of the market. Rents have gone up, and those who can’t afford to pay are leaving the neighborhood to other, more dangerous favelas. The residents are not being allowed to enjoy the new security. All the new restaurants and hotels are for the foreigners — not for the locals. Hear the story here.